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11/02/2012

Comments

Rich Ruh

Tangentially, do you still use Light Impressions? They were always my vendor of choice, but my most recent experience was not a good one. That was over a year ago, but they are still rated "F" by the BBB. Perhaps they've improved?

Barry Wolf

I got to thinking today about the impact of technology on the art of photography. Specifically, how would Ansel Adams, Weston, and other greats work be greeted if it was just produced today? With the advent of the new digital technology you can squeeze so much tonal range and excitement out of an image would their work stand out as much as it did? Of course, the primacy of the message, the emotion of the image and the creativity can't be bested by technology. I guess the point I'm getting at is, that it is so much easier for us to create wonderful images then it was for Adams and his peers. I was so inspired by Adam's images when I first started out 35 years ago to create beautiful images that communicated my feelings about what I was seeing. In their images I saw and felt what I believed they were feeling. That hasn't changed, what has changed is the profound amount of beautiful landscape images being produced. So would we still admire Adam's images as much today because of the impact and proliferation of the new technology?

Everyone's thoughts?

Brooks Jensen

Light Impressions: I must confess, I haven't purchased anything from them for years. I'd stocked up on boxes and archival negative storage about 10 years ago and still have unused supplies left over. I'm not sure what happened, but there are lots of bad vibes and stories about them over the last few years. It would be an interesting tale if someone who knew the inside scoop could tell it.

Brooks Jensen

Barry,
We're stewing on that very issue with an idea than might add some fun to LensWork Daily. Stay tuned.

Chuck Kimmerle

To the topic at hand, you can count me in the camp which unapologetically deletes images which deemed unworthy. For me, it's not a matter of "economizing storage space", but rather uncluttering and simplifying the artistic side of my life. I find that having too many sub par image files to be a distraction from those I truly like. Being somewhat ruthless in my editing/deleting, I truly believe, encourages me, at least subconsciously, to be more attentive and creative during the actual shooting.

Sure, I am bound to toss out a couple images which may, on second or third look, be much better than I had originally thought, but the benefits of a neater and lighter image file system far outweighs, at least for me, that risk.

That said, I do keep a goodly number of files I don't think are the cream of the crop but may have some redeeming value, but in no way would I ever consider keeping everything.

Jonathan Martin-DeMoor

I also factor in the "cost" of deleting files in terms of the amount of my time it takes to go back and decide which to delete. If I spend an hour thinning out my files, deleting a few hundred megabytes, and you can buy a 2TB drive for $99... Well you do the math and figure if your time is worth that, especially when you could be spending the time processing or printing new photos, etc.

I find a good rating system in Lightroom, combined with filters and Smart Collections, makes it easy to look at just the photos you want to while retaining the ability to go back and find the "diamonds in the rough" as Brooks mentioned.

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